Last Updated On March 9, 2017

 

"It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences." -Audre Lorde

 

 

I INVITE ALL OF YOU TO COME LISTEN TO “SUFFRAGE STORIES” DURING THE ITHACA SPRING WRITES LITERARY FESTIVAL, HOSTED BY NORA SNYDER AND STACEY MURPHY, WITH READINGS FROM WRITERS SOON TO BE FEATURED IN NY VOTES FOR WOMEN: A SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL ANTHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY CAYUGA LAKE BOOKS .

SUNDAY MAY 7, 2017

2:30PM

AT THE HISTORY CENTER IN TOMPKINS COUNTY

HEAR STORIES FROM ERICA BRATH, JENNIFER CREMERIUS, RACHEL DICKINSON, BARBARA MINK, LIZ THOMPSON

Here is a link to more information, https://suffragestories.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/the-spring-writes-literary-festival-program-is-now-online/

As well as the Facebook invite to the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1177810798997766/

When Stacey asked me to partner with her in creating a NYS Women’s Suffrage Centennial Anthology, my gut screamed YES. I knew intuitively that this was an important endeavor, that it needed to exist in the world. And I could almost see it in future me’s eyes, shiny and completed. It felt like another rope thrown over, mooring my writer’s support group, Writer’s Block Party, as real and necessary. I’m so drawn to the idea of anthologies. Contributing, yes. But more so in the compiling, collecting, and lovingly homing the eclectic contributions of others and participating in that *big mind* feeling of thinking about the same thing with so many different angles and tangents.

FullSizeRender-23

But shortly after I agreed, I felt a malaise descend. I experienced a heightened level of avoidance about the project that was unusual even for me. Even though I acknowledged the importance, the purpose, I could not use that to alley-oop into action. I could not engage, I was like a perpetually upside down USB stick. Unable to connect or start. And limping with guilt over for not delivering or supporting Stacey in the heart led way I wanted to. I slung my typical arrows at myself- Lazy. Half-asser. Undisciplined.

FullSizeRender-24

Finally, under Stacey’s gentle witness, I laid myself bare.  Exposing my ambivalence, my interest yet lack of motivation, and my inability to find a home in the project. It was like a bottle uncorked! With that pressure released and my words meeting the light of day, it all felt lighter, less mysterious, workable, almost effervescent. Pictured above is my reminder that carrying shame on your back, letting it crush and limit you is not some kind of penance you need to pay for your very human feelings. Masochism and martyrdom is really a fool’s errand and a dead end. Here’s to giving ourselves (and our work and our process) credit and giving credit to others! Its actually more than ok to just say it.

16251885_220434378419038_1238693292124005750_o

photo credit: Stacey Murphy

 

As we’ve delved into this project I started to see that I’m not alone in my ambivalence. As I talked to people about submitting work to the anthology, it became clear how difficult it was to connect with the women’s suffrage movement in a meaningful way. It was shadowy and elusive, is this history relevant to us now or not? How do we reference it in a way that feels authentic? Is this a story that we individually belong in- given our diversity in age, ethnicity, race, gender identity, *fill-in-the-blank*? These questions are so hard but also seem to resonate bigger, as we strive for more inclusiveness and intersectionality present day.

 

15995271_217351468727329_497065632736315813_o

created by Liza Donovan

There is urgency and pressure to SHOW UP, ACT, RESIST in our political climate these days, understandably. But I think we are all left with a lot of questions about what this means for us personally, how are talents and perspectives fit in that picture. As women, I fear we fall back on familiar feelings of inadequacy, being not enough, full of guilt for not doing more or better. This energy is just as toxic as our failure to be inclusive or intersectional in the past. It is debilitating. It is dividing. Diversity is a big word. It covers a lot of ground. I like the idea of a diversity of efforts, contributions that spring from strengths,  talents, and fire. Not buzzwords. Lets begin by trusting women- with their bodies and reproductive decisions but also with whether or not they choose to wear a pussy hat. As I demonstrated with my small personal example above- sustainable momentum cannot be built by shame. Because once we start parsing out whose efforts matter and whose don’t, who is sacrificing enough and who is not, I think we come dangerously close to determining who has value.  This self-righteous streak has done much to damage movements of all kinds.

IMG_4099

Interestingly, after I finally and somewhat painfully banged out my own contribution to the anthology, I came across something in my google drive. My daughter had written a paper months ago for her gender and women’s studies class. I remember her telling me, in her intense, serious way- did you know the Stonewall Riots were led by two WOMEN? Right away I had trouble computing. I don’t know much about the Stonewall Riots. I know it crossed my consciousness when president Obama declared the area around the Stonewall Inn as the first national monument to LGBT rights. I know that I assumed white dudes led the charge. When I came across her paper again, I shivered with recognition because I was revisiting that same feeling of disconnect that I have with the women’s suffrage movement- the distortion, the miseducation, the deletion, the oversimplification, the indoctrination of our history.

Silvia Rivera (with cooler) Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

Silvia Rivera (with cooler)
Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

I offer some excepts from my daughter’s paper to tell this story that needs telling.

“The Unsung Women Leaders of the Stonewall Riots

In 1969, the Stonewall Inn was one of few running Lesbian Gay Bi Trans- (LGBT) centric bars. On June 28th, the New York City police initiated a raid on the bar, attracting a crowd of over 150 civilians as the police wrongfully handcuffed and arrested groups of LGBT individuals. This happened often, with constant raids on LGBT bars and hangouts, with police focusing specifically on arresting LGBT individuals for even the smallest misdemeanor.

However, this time the patrons of the bar (as well as the civilians drawn to the raid) fought back, tired and fed-up with the constant police raids, brutalities, and injustices that LGBT people had endured for years…

News of this riot spread quickly, and by the next night, thousands of protesters rallied around the Stonewall Inn and fought the police that came to arrest them. This also happened a third night; and these riots are heralded as the beginning of the modern LGBT movement. These protestors consisted of LGBT people and non-LGBT people who supported and fought for LGBT rights.

However, historical documentations of this movement did not give proper justice to the two pioneers of the initial riot at Stonewall. These two transgender women of color, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, are the two leading (yet largely unrecognized as a whole) faces of the June 28th 1969 Stonewall Inn riot.

Marsha P. Johnson (1945 – 1992), a black transgender woman…became a strong activist for LGBT rights, probably due to the discrimination and transphobia she faced daily just for existing as a trans woman in society.

Marsha also was an activist during the 1980s AIDs epidemic. She was seen doing demonstrations on Wall Street to protest the inordinate prices of experimental AIDs drugs. She also teamed up with activist Sylvia Rivera and founded The Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.), which was an activist group for transgender individuals.

Marsha Johnson died in 1992, her body was found in the Hudson River, having died of mysterious circumstances… There have been attempts to reopen her case, however is it still currently closed.

On the night of the Stonewall Riot, Sylvia Rivera (1951 – 2002) was a 17 year old Puerto Rican drag queen (she would later come out as a trans woman), …is quoted as shouting “I’m not missing a minute of this. It’s the revolution!”. Sylvia Rivera joined the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) and became a very energetic and dedicated activist for LGBT rights and liberation, particularly the campaign for New York City to pass a Gay Rights Bill. She was famous for her arrest while climbing the walls of City Hall in a dress and heels, to crash a closed-door meeting discussing the bill.

Sylvia also joined activist Marsha P. Johnson to form S.T.A.R., and her work is being furthered by the continuing SRLP– the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, an organization working towards ending poverty and discrimination regarding gender identity…”

15726554_207590226370120_914952241831195599_n

I am so grateful for this gift from my daughter, to know this story and be changed by it. And so I give it to you. But it made me cry. I wept for my ignorance. I wept for  Marsha’s poor broken body left like flotsam in the Hudson. I wept for the mere 35 year average lifespan for trans women of color- today. I wept in amazement of their courage and vulnerability. And I noticed the longer I looked at their parade photo, the more it reminded me of the photo of suffragettes above.  I don’t think that Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Marsha P Johnson would necessarily have a drink together (although who knows, people mellow with age) but its like these women were touched with the same spirit urging- change is needed, the time is now. In 1917, 1969, and maybe 2017.

Once again, for people in the cheap seats:

SHE CLIMBED THE WALLS OF CITY HALL IN DRESS AND HEELS.

I sing you, Marsha and Sylvia. You climb. I sing.

 

 

 

Last Updated On March 9, 2017

 

"It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences." -Audre Lorde

 

I INVITE ALL OF YOU TO COME LISTEN TO “SUFFRAGE STORIES” DURING THE ITHACA SPRING WRITES LITERARY FESTIVAL, HOSTED BY NORA SNYDER AND STACEY MURPHY, WITH READINGS FROM WRITERS SOON TO BE FEATURED IN NY VOTES FOR WOMEN: A SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL ANTHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY CAYUGA LAKE BOOKS .

SUNDAY MAY 7, 2017

2:30PM

AT THE HISTORY CENTER IN TOMPKINS COUNTY

HEAR STORIES FROM ERICA BRATH, JENNIFER CREMERIUS, RACHEL DICKINSON, BARBARA MINK, LIZ THOMPSON

Here is a link to more information, https://suffragestories.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/the-spring-writes-literary-festival-program-is-now-online/

As well as the Facebook invite to the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1177810798997766/

When Stacey asked me to partner with her in creating a NYS Women’s Suffrage Centennial Anthology, my gut screamed YES. I knew intuitively that this was an important endeavor, that it needed to exist in the world. And I could almost see it in future me’s eyes, shiny and completed. It felt like another rope thrown over, mooring my writer’s support group, Writer’s Block Party, as real and necessary. I’m so drawn to the idea of anthologies. Contributing, yes. But more so in the compiling, collecting, and lovingly homing the eclectic contributions of others and participating in that *big mind* feeling of thinking about the same thing with so many different angles and tangents.

FullSizeRender-23

But shortly after I agreed, I felt a malaise descend. I experienced a heightened level of avoidance about the project that was unusual even for me. Even though I acknowledged the importance, the purpose, I could not use that to alley-oop into action. I could not engage, I was like a perpetually upside down USB stick. Unable to connect or start. And limping with guilt over for not delivering or supporting Stacey in the heart led way I wanted to. I slung my typical arrows at myself- Lazy. Half-asser. Undisciplined.

FullSizeRender-24

Finally, under Stacey’s gentle witness, I laid myself bare.  Exposing my ambivalence, my interest yet lack of motivation, and my inability to find a home in the project. It was like a bottle uncorked! With that pressure released and my words meeting the light of day, it all felt lighter, less mysterious, workable, almost effervescent. Pictured above is my reminder that carrying shame on your back, letting it crush and limit you is not some kind of penance you need to pay for your very human feelings. Masochism and martyrdom is really a fool’s errand and a dead end. Here’s to giving ourselves (and our work and our process) credit and giving credit to others! Its actually more than ok to just say it.

16251885_220434378419038_1238693292124005750_o

photo credit: Stacey Murphy

 

As we’ve delved into this project I started to see that I’m not alone in my ambivalence. As I talked to people about submitting work to the anthology, it became clear how difficult it was to connect with the women’s suffrage movement in a meaningful way. It was shadowy and elusive, is this history relevant to us now or not? How do we reference it in a way that feels authentic? Is this a story that we individually belong in- given our diversity in age, ethnicity, race, gender identity, *fill-in-the-blank*? These questions are so hard but also seem to resonate bigger, as we strive for more inclusiveness and intersectionality present day.

 

15995271_217351468727329_497065632736315813_o

created by Liza Donovan

There is urgency and pressure to SHOW UP, ACT, RESIST in our political climate these days, understandably. But I think we are all left with a lot of questions about what this means for us personally, how are talents and perspectives fit in that picture. As women, I fear we fall back on familiar feelings of inadequacy, being not enough, full of guilt for not doing more or better. This energy is just as toxic as our failure to be inclusive or intersectional in the past. It is debilitating. It is dividing. Diversity is a big word. It covers a lot of ground. I like the idea of a diversity of efforts, contributions that spring from strengths,  talents, and fire. Not buzzwords. Lets begin by trusting women- with their bodies and reproductive decisions but also with whether or not they choose to wear a pussy hat. As I demonstrated with my small personal example above- sustainable momentum cannot be built by shame. Because once we start parsing out whose efforts matter and whose don’t, who is sacrificing enough and who is not, I think we come dangerously close to determining who has value.  This self-righteous streak has done much to damage movements of all kinds.

IMG_4099

Interestingly, after I finally and somewhat painfully banged out my own contribution to the anthology, I came across something in my google drive. My daughter had written a paper months ago for her gender and women’s studies class. I remember her telling me, in her intense, serious way- did you know the Stonewall Riots were led by two WOMEN? Right away I had trouble computing. I don’t know much about the Stonewall Riots. I know it crossed my consciousness when president Obama declared the area around the Stonewall Inn as the first national monument to LGBT rights. I know that I assumed white dudes led the charge. When I came across her paper again, I shivered with recognition because I was revisiting that same feeling of disconnect that I have with the women’s suffrage movement- the distortion, the miseducation, the deletion, the oversimplification, the indoctrination of our history.

Silvia Rivera (with cooler) Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

Silvia Rivera (with cooler)
Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

I offer some excepts from my daughter’s paper to tell this story that needs telling.

“The Unsung Women Leaders of the Stonewall Riots

In 1969, the Stonewall Inn was one of few running Lesbian Gay Bi Trans- (LGBT) centric bars. On June 28th, the New York City police initiated a raid on the bar, attracting a crowd of over 150 civilians as the police wrongfully handcuffed and arrested groups of LGBT individuals. This happened often, with constant raids on LGBT bars and hangouts, with police focusing specifically on arresting LGBT individuals for even the smallest misdemeanor.

However, this time the patrons of the bar (as well as the civilians drawn to the raid) fought back, tired and fed-up with the constant police raids, brutalities, and injustices that LGBT people had endured for years…

News of this riot spread quickly, and by the next night, thousands of protesters rallied around the Stonewall Inn and fought the police that came to arrest them. This also happened a third night; and these riots are heralded as the beginning of the modern LGBT movement. These protestors consisted of LGBT people and non-LGBT people who supported and fought for LGBT rights.

However, historical documentations of this movement did not give proper justice to the two pioneers of the initial riot at Stonewall. These two transgender women of color, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, are the two leading (yet largely unrecognized as a whole) faces of the June 28th 1969 Stonewall Inn riot.

Marsha P. Johnson (1945 – 1992), a black transgender woman…became a strong activist for LGBT rights, probably due to the discrimination and transphobia she faced daily just for existing as a trans woman in society.

Marsha also was an activist during the 1980s AIDs epidemic. She was seen doing demonstrations on Wall Street to protest the inordinate prices of experimental AIDs drugs. She also teamed up with activist Sylvia Rivera and founded The Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.), which was an activist group for transgender individuals.

Marsha Johnson died in 1992, her body was found in the Hudson River, having died of mysterious circumstances… There have been attempts to reopen her case, however is it still currently closed.

On the night of the Stonewall Riot, Sylvia Rivera (1951 – 2002) was a 17 year old Puerto Rican drag queen (she would later come out as a trans woman), …is quoted as shouting “I’m not missing a minute of this. It’s the revolution!”. Sylvia Rivera joined the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) and became a very energetic and dedicated activist for LGBT rights and liberation, particularly the campaign for New York City to pass a Gay Rights Bill. She was famous for her arrest while climbing the walls of City Hall in a dress and heels, to crash a closed-door meeting discussing the bill.

Sylvia also joined activist Marsha P. Johnson to form S.T.A.R., and her work is being furthered by the continuing SRLP– the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, an organization working towards ending poverty and discrimination regarding gender identity…”

15726554_207590226370120_914952241831195599_n

I am so grateful for this gift from my daughter, to know this story and be changed by it. And so I give it to you. But it made me cry. I wept for my ignorance. I wept for  Marsha’s poor broken body left like flotsam in the Hudson. I wept for the mere 35 year average lifespan for trans women of color- today. I wept in amazement of their courage and vulnerability. And I noticed the longer I looked at their parade photo, the more it reminded me of the photo of suffragettes above.  I don’t think that Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Marsha P Johnson would necessarily have a drink together (although who knows, people mellow with age) but its like these women were touched with the same spirit urging- change is needed, the time is now. In 1917, 1969, and maybe 2017.

Once again, for people in the cheap seats:

SHE CLIMBED THE WALLS OF CITY HALL IN DRESS AND HEELS.

I sing you, Marsha and Sylvia. You climb. I sing.

 

 

Last Updated On March 9, 2017

"It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences." -Audre Lorde

I INVITE ALL OF YOU TO COME LISTEN TO “SUFFRAGE STORIES” DURING THE ITHACA SPRING WRITES LITERARY FESTIVAL, HOSTED BY NORA SNYDER AND STACEY MURPHY, WITH READINGS FROM WRITERS SOON TO BE FEATURED IN NY VOTES FOR WOMEN: A SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL ANTHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY CAYUGA LAKE BOOKS .

SUNDAY MAY 7, 2017

2:30PM

AT THE HISTORY CENTER IN TOMPKINS COUNTY

HEAR STORIES FROM ERICA BRATH, JENNIFER CREMERIUS, RACHEL DICKINSON, BARBARA MINK, LIZ THOMPSON

Here is a link to more information, https://suffragestories.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/the-spring-writes-literary-festival-program-is-now-online/

As well as the Facebook invite to the event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1177810798997766/

When Stacey asked me to partner with her in creating a NYS Women’s Suffrage Centennial Anthology, my gut screamed YES. I knew intuitively that this was an important endeavor, that it needed to exist in the world. And I could almost see it in future me’s eyes, shiny and completed. It felt like another rope thrown over, mooring my writer’s support group, Writer’s Block Party, as real and necessary. I’m so drawn to the idea of anthologies. Contributing, yes. But more so in the compiling, collecting, and lovingly homing the eclectic contributions of others and participating in that *big mind* feeling of thinking about the same thing with so many different angles and tangents.

FullSizeRender-23

But shortly after I agreed, I felt a malaise descend. I experienced a heightened level of avoidance about the project that was unusual even for me. Even though I acknowledged the importance, the purpose, I could not use that to alley-oop into action. I could not engage, I was like a perpetually upside down USB stick. Unable to connect or start. And limping with guilt over for not delivering or supporting Stacey in the heart led way I wanted to. I slung my typical arrows at myself- Lazy. Half-asser. Undisciplined.

FullSizeRender-24

Finally, under Stacey’s gentle witness, I laid myself bare.  Exposing my ambivalence, my interest yet lack of motivation, and my inability to find a home in the project. It was like a bottle uncorked! With that pressure released and my words meeting the light of day, it all felt lighter, less mysterious, workable, almost effervescent. Pictured above is my reminder that carrying shame on your back, letting it crush and limit you is not some kind of penance you need to pay for your very human feelings. Masochism and martyrdom is really a fool’s errand and a dead end. Here’s to giving ourselves (and our work and our process) credit and giving credit to others! Its actually more than ok to just say it.

16251885_220434378419038_1238693292124005750_o

photo credit: Stacey Murphy

 

As we’ve delved into this project I started to see that I’m not alone in my ambivalence. As I talked to people about submitting work to the anthology, it became clear how difficult it was to connect with the women’s suffrage movement in a meaningful way. It was shadowy and elusive, is this history relevant to us now or not? How do we reference it in a way that feels authentic? Is this a story that we individually belong in- given our diversity in age, ethnicity, race, gender identity, *fill-in-the-blank*? These questions are so hard but also seem to resonate bigger, as we strive for more inclusiveness and intersectionality present day.

 

15995271_217351468727329_497065632736315813_o

created by Liza Donovan

There is urgency and pressure to SHOW UP, ACT, RESIST in our political climate these days, understandably. But I think we are all left with a lot of questions about what this means for us personally, how are talents and perspectives fit in that picture. As women, I fear we fall back on familiar feelings of inadequacy, being not enough, full of guilt for not doing more or better. This energy is just as toxic as our failure to be inclusive or intersectional in the past. It is debilitating. It is dividing. Diversity is a big word. It covers a lot of ground. I like the idea of a diversity of efforts, contributions that spring from strengths,  talents, and fire. Not buzzwords. Lets begin by trusting women- with their bodies and reproductive decisions but also with whether or not they choose to wear a pussy hat. As I demonstrated with my small personal example above- sustainable momentum cannot be built by shame. Because once we start parsing out whose efforts matter and whose don’t, who is sacrificing enough and who is not, I think we come dangerously close to determining who has value.  This self-righteous streak has done much to damage movements of all kinds.

IMG_4099

Interestingly, after I finally and somewhat painfully banged out my own contribution to the anthology, I came across something in my google drive. My daughter had written a paper months ago for her gender and women’s studies class. I remember her telling me, in her intense, serious way- did you know the Stonewall Riots were led by two WOMEN? Right away I had trouble computing. I don’t know much about the Stonewall Riots. I know it crossed my consciousness when president Obama declared the area around the Stonewall Inn as the first national monument to LGBT rights. I know that I assumed white dudes led the charge. When I came across her paper again, I shivered with recognition because I was revisiting that same feeling of disconnect that I have with the women’s suffrage movement- the distortion, the miseducation, the deletion, the oversimplification, the indoctrination of our history.

Silvia Rivera (with cooler) Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

Silvia Rivera (with cooler)
Marsha P Johnson (with banner)

I offer some excepts from my daughter’s paper to tell this story that needs telling.

“The Unsung Women Leaders of the Stonewall Riots

In 1969, the Stonewall Inn was one of few running Lesbian Gay Bi Trans- (LGBT) centric bars. On June 28th, the New York City police initiated a raid on the bar, attracting a crowd of over 150 civilians as the police wrongfully handcuffed and arrested groups of LGBT individuals. This happened often, with constant raids on LGBT bars and hangouts, with police focusing specifically on arresting LGBT individuals for even the smallest misdemeanor.

However, this time the patrons of the bar (as well as the civilians drawn to the raid) fought back, tired and fed-up with the constant police raids, brutalities, and injustices that LGBT people had endured for years…

News of this riot spread quickly, and by the next night, thousands of protesters rallied around the Stonewall Inn and fought the police that came to arrest them. This also happened a third night; and these riots are heralded as the beginning of the modern LGBT movement. These protestors consisted of LGBT people and non-LGBT people who supported and fought for LGBT rights.

However, historical documentations of this movement did not give proper justice to the two pioneers of the initial riot at Stonewall. These two transgender women of color, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, are the two leading (yet largely unrecognized as a whole) faces of the June 28th 1969 Stonewall Inn riot.

Marsha P. Johnson (1945 – 1992), a black transgender woman…became a strong activist for LGBT rights, probably due to the discrimination and transphobia she faced daily just for existing as a trans woman in society.

Marsha also was an activist during the 1980s AIDs epidemic. She was seen doing demonstrations on Wall Street to protest the inordinate prices of experimental AIDs drugs. She also teamed up with activist Sylvia Rivera and founded The Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.), which was an activist group for transgender individuals.

Marsha Johnson died in 1992, her body was found in the Hudson River, having died of mysterious circumstances… There have been attempts to reopen her case, however is it still currently closed.

On the night of the Stonewall Riot, Sylvia Rivera (1951 – 2002) was a 17 year old Puerto Rican drag queen (she would later come out as a trans woman), …is quoted as shouting “I’m not missing a minute of this. It’s the revolution!”. Sylvia Rivera joined the Gay Activists Alliance (GAA) and became a very energetic and dedicated activist for LGBT rights and liberation, particularly the campaign for New York City to pass a Gay Rights Bill. She was famous for her arrest while climbing the walls of City Hall in a dress and heels, to crash a closed-door meeting discussing the bill.

Sylvia also joined activist Marsha P. Johnson to form S.T.A.R., and her work is being furthered by the continuing SRLP– the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, an organization working towards ending poverty and discrimination regarding gender identity…”

15726554_207590226370120_914952241831195599_n

I am so grateful for this gift from my daughter, to know this story and be changed by it. And so I give it to you. But it made me cry. I wept for my ignorance. I wept for  Marsha’s poor broken body left like flotsam in the Hudson. I wept for the mere 35 year average lifespan for trans women of color- today. I wept in amazement of their courage and vulnerability. And I noticed the longer I looked at their parade photo, the more it reminded me of the photo of suffragettes above.  I don’t think that Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Marsha P Johnson would necessarily have a drink together (although who knows, people mellow with age) but its like these women were touched with the same spirit urging- change is needed, the time is now. In 1917, 1969, and maybe 2017.

Once again, for people in the cheap seats:

SHE CLIMBED THE WALLS OF CITY HALL IN DRESS AND HEELS.

I sing you, Marsha and Sylvia. You climb. I sing.