Last Updated On December 5, 2017

 

may your days be merry and bright

 

 

December 4, 2017

Hello my little nutcrack-a-lackers! Welcome to Day Four.

During this time of year we often feel a sense of not enough, of lack. And lack is a slippery thing because it rests in comparison, our individual perceptions, and our stories (both external experience stories and internal cognitive stories).

How tightly do we cling to “shoulds”? How resilient are we when things don’t work out or measure up to our ideal? Do we feel the burn of jealousy, resentment, entitlement, embarrassment when it comes to what we don’t have? Are we able to be truly happy for someone else when we are mourning our lack?

And everybody is so different with their standards. What one perceives as lacking, another might envy, and yet another might consider their worst nightmare. So this becomes an issue too, the difficulty of sharing these concerns, feeling awkward and lonely about it, anxious that you could be met with misunderstanding or disgust.

Its OK. You don’t have to feel bad about your not having AND feel bad about wanting it in the first place.  The salient thing here is- it is painful when you feel you don’t have the time, the money, the comforts, the attitude, the relationships (etc.) that you perceive others to have. You feel like a failure, broken, isolated. And this time of year really rubs our noses in it with all those shiny Christmas cards arriving, countless spotless social media posts in our feed, and the general rampant consumerism heavy in the air.

It feels good, especially right now, to ground ourselves by acknowledging what we DO have. And its best if we try to do it in a really intrinsic way, leaving the world and its noise behind. Keep it light, no guilt, no shame- just touch-points of appreciation.

On this 4th day of advent, I invite you to…yes, write in a gratitude journal. I know! Its so Oprah! I’ve always scoffed at gratitude journals and as I’ve said before, every time I scoff I can almost hear the gears of the universe grinding so that I end up doing whatever I was scoffing at. Its actually fun. Sometimes I look at the pics on my phone to prompt me. Sometimes it feels like poetry. I like to depart from the obvious (like friends and family) and delve into the esoteric like appreciating seeing the moon in the day time, or how nonpareils feel when I bite them, or the Ithaca reference in season 4, episode 7 of Bojack Horseman.

If you want extra credit and you haven’t shown love for your appliances lately, listen to this guided meditation by Louise Hay, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jNV1FV-_Os

Stay strong and much love to you. oxoxoxoxo

 

Last Updated On December 5, 2017

 

may your days be merry and bright

 

December 4, 2017

Hello my little nutcrack-a-lackers! Welcome to Day Four.

During this time of year we often feel a sense of not enough, of lack. And lack is a slippery thing because it rests in comparison, our individual perceptions, and our stories (both external experience stories and internal cognitive stories).

How tightly do we cling to “shoulds”? How resilient are we when things don’t work out or measure up to our ideal? Do we feel the burn of jealousy, resentment, entitlement, embarrassment when it comes to what we don’t have? Are we able to be truly happy for someone else when we are mourning our lack?

And everybody is so different with their standards. What one perceives as lacking, another might envy, and yet another might consider their worst nightmare. So this becomes an issue too, the difficulty of sharing these concerns, feeling awkward and lonely about it, anxious that you could be met with misunderstanding or disgust.

Its OK. You don’t have to feel bad about your not having AND feel bad about wanting it in the first place.  The salient thing here is- it is painful when you feel you don’t have the time, the money, the comforts, the attitude, the relationships (etc.) that you perceive others to have. You feel like a failure, broken, isolated. And this time of year really rubs our noses in it with all those shiny Christmas cards arriving, countless spotless social media posts in our feed, and the general rampant consumerism heavy in the air.

It feels good, especially right now, to ground ourselves by acknowledging what we DO have. And its best if we try to do it in a really intrinsic way, leaving the world and its noise behind. Keep it light, no guilt, no shame- just touch-points of appreciation.

On this 4th day of advent, I invite you to…yes, write in a gratitude journal. I know! Its so Oprah! I’ve always scoffed at gratitude journals and as I’ve said before, every time I scoff I can almost hear the gears of the universe grinding so that I end up doing whatever I was scoffing at. Its actually fun. Sometimes I look at the pics on my phone to prompt me. Sometimes it feels like poetry. I like to depart from the obvious (like friends and family) and delve into the esoteric like appreciating seeing the moon in the day time, or how nonpareils feel when I bite them, or the Ithaca reference in season 4, episode 7 of Bojack Horseman.

If you want extra credit and you haven’t shown love for your appliances lately, listen to this guided meditation by Louise Hay, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jNV1FV-_Os

Stay strong and much love to you. oxoxoxoxo

Last Updated On December 5, 2017

may your days be merry and bright

December 4, 2017

Hello my little nutcrack-a-lackers! Welcome to Day Four.

During this time of year we often feel a sense of not enough, of lack. And lack is a slippery thing because it rests in comparison, our individual perceptions, and our stories (both external experience stories and internal cognitive stories).

How tightly do we cling to “shoulds”? How resilient are we when things don’t work out or measure up to our ideal? Do we feel the burn of jealousy, resentment, entitlement, embarrassment when it comes to what we don’t have? Are we able to be truly happy for someone else when we are mourning our lack?

And everybody is so different with their standards. What one perceives as lacking, another might envy, and yet another might consider their worst nightmare. So this becomes an issue too, the difficulty of sharing these concerns, feeling awkward and lonely about it, anxious that you could be met with misunderstanding or disgust.

Its OK. You don’t have to feel bad about your not having AND feel bad about wanting it in the first place.  The salient thing here is- it is painful when you feel you don’t have the time, the money, the comforts, the attitude, the relationships (etc.) that you perceive others to have. You feel like a failure, broken, isolated. And this time of year really rubs our noses in it with all those shiny Christmas cards arriving, countless spotless social media posts in our feed, and the general rampant consumerism heavy in the air.

It feels good, especially right now, to ground ourselves by acknowledging what we DO have. And its best if we try to do it in a really intrinsic way, leaving the world and its noise behind. Keep it light, no guilt, no shame- just touch-points of appreciation.

On this 4th day of advent, I invite you to…yes, write in a gratitude journal. I know! Its so Oprah! I’ve always scoffed at gratitude journals and as I’ve said before, every time I scoff I can almost hear the gears of the universe grinding so that I end up doing whatever I was scoffing at. Its actually fun. Sometimes I look at the pics on my phone to prompt me. Sometimes it feels like poetry. I like to depart from the obvious (like friends and family) and delve into the esoteric like appreciating seeing the moon in the day time, or how nonpareils feel when I bite them, or the Ithaca reference in season 4, episode 7 of Bojack Horseman.

If you want extra credit and you haven’t shown love for your appliances lately, listen to this guided meditation by Louise Hay, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jNV1FV-_Os

Stay strong and much love to you. oxoxoxoxo