Last Updated On March 20, 2018

 

This is just a taste of what Flux Box has to offer for your writing practice. Pictured above is our very own Judi Galgoczy of Sacred Root Kava and Tea Bar's custom blend CreativiTEA included in your first box!

 

 

Pre-order your Flux Box today (no obligation) and get your $5 coupon towards your first purchase!

Dear Writers,

Some of you are going to be the type that have laptop out, pen in hand and will want to get to the meat of the matter quickly, while others of you will want the back story, the meander, the build-up before digging in. Feel free to use these questions as a jumping off point for writing/art/journaling or just meditate on them, letting them infuse your daily self-talk and decision making.

And I totally understand because I am both of you. Either read the italicized “For You” sections first or save them until the end. Or heck, do both.

I just finished Michelle McNamara’s first and only novel, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer. I still feel affected, stunned even.
True Crime
Purpose
Mortality
All these concepts that loom large for me right now. Mirrored.

For You: How is what you are reading or otherwise being exposed to, affecting your person and your practice? Are there images or concepts that seem to be coming back to you? What is this season for?

I spent the week doing some creative projects that aren’t writing. I kept feeling drawn to other things and at first I resisted because I felt like my time is so finite and I didn’t trust myself with prioritization. And if I didn’t finish my “have-to’s” and the planned things directly associated with my craft and business, then I had no right to engage in extraneous projects. Right? Is this how it works?

For You: What is your philosophy or strategy when it comes to prioritizing your creative work? Is this something that requires reflection? Does it change over time?

And this whole process excludes family time of course, because family trumps everything (we’ll get back to this).

However I’m realizing that sometimes there are more mysterious, subconscious forces at work and taking these side adventures are so much more central and integrated than I initially suspect. Also- there are lessons and motor memory in the ALLOWING; the allowing of surrender, the allowing of following instincts, the allowing of bringing something into fruition, the allowing of stepping outside linear living, the allowing of inexperience, the allowing of finishing or not finishing, the allowing of having expectations met or not, the allowing of flexibility in vision, the allowing of floundering, of tolerance.

For You: What are your side adventures? How do they inform your process? What do you learn in the ALLOWING?

And then there are the questions of productivity, how to negotiate the weighing of what is a waste of time. A question for the ages with no standard, no objective data. And then there is the peer pressure and the murky areas where “wasting time” feels more acceptable (like media consumption etc.), while other pursuits are pushed back.

Its hard to be intrinsically motivated, your own lonely motor, being led by an unshakable idea shared by no one propelling you forward. It can be a little intimidating- without labels, without recompense.

For You: If its not money and its not notoriety, what keeps you going? What brings you back when you are ready to quit?

And then there are the inner and outer voices of dissent and guilt listing all the things more deserving of your attention. But here’s the thing: if you WEREN’T following your bliss would your house be pristine, would you be flush with cash, would your children be more perfect? Probably fucking not.

For You: As a flight of fantasy, what would it actually look like if you truly wasted your time? Seriously. Take it to the extreme. Write it out science fiction style.

So maybe this IS self care.

Stepping outside.

Maybe we have been grossly miseducated about the actual nature of nurturing our own selves. And it has been so enmeshed with our patriarchal, consumerist, busy worshipping culture that we can’t even discern it through this distortion. Its become like blindly throwing darts at spa days and yoga retreats and whatever rather than listening to what our wisest selves are trying so hard to tell us.

For You: What is this “self-care”- go! PS- I have nothing against yoga or spas.

Let me back up a little to Michelle’s book. Actually let me back up a little more to Michelle herself. Michelle McNamara was wife to actor/comedian Patton Oswalt if that gives you context. I know her through True Crime Diary (her beautifully written and thoughtfully conceived blog). Michelle died young and unexpectedly before she finished her book.

Finding a truly great true crime writer is rare. And I say that as a total non-genre-snob reader. And believe me, I’ve clawed my way through the painful scrawlings of true crime authors just to glean more information about fascinating cases, tomes not much removed from the terse police reports they were probably ripped from (I’m looking at you Zodiac). But some true crime writers…they have the touch. They bring you into their world of connection to events and humanize perpetrator, victim, and investigator all. They are skilled storytellers that can weave a riveting narrative from sometimes complicated, scant, or incomplete fact bringing the whole thing to life and clarity without violating the “true” in true crime. And just when you settle into the hum of linear expository aspects, they hit you with a detail so excruciatingly human that its like a gut punch. In a good way of course.

For You: Some of my favorite true crime novels- In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule. Have you written any true stories? Investigative journalism? Would it be fun to try?

I will never tire of this flow. The TRUE part is really foundational for me, and in this case Michelle’s truth is as well. Reading her book was an immersive experience but not an escapist one. Knowing about her death put me on a parallel path of experiencing it. As she describes her long road trips to revisit crime scenes, late nights doing research, and her self described distraction and obsession with the Golden State Killer case- I kept asking her, if you knew, would you do anything different? Followed by the occasion intrusive thought of “oh my God, she has no idea!”.

None of us has any idea.

And I realize that this is a concept that I am drawn to exploring through true crime- one day normal, the next unimaginable. So it is this duality that made reading Michelle’s book so heart opening.

For You: Why do you like what you like? This is a really important question. Break it down.

What did I learn from Michelle:

Don’t be afraid to lean toward passion.

When I saw pictures of Michelle’s six year old daughter Alice pretending to proofread a manuscript or snuggled in bed next to Michelle while she does research on God knows what on her laptop- it struck me that there is so much room for connection in life. Unscripted, unplanned, unpackaged connection as mothers as partners, as friends and there is also plenty of room for US. Room for OUR passions and OUR purpose as part of this expanse.

Time is finite but relative. I realize that its not always easy, there are conflicts and limited resources and all that but I KNOW that I have released in ways I didn’t need to, in the name of family but not actually to their benefit or request.

It is scary to lean toward passion, to make that leap, to be responsible for that decision. But over and over again I see examples of the richness and fullness of a passionate life lived. Michelle had EVERY reason to put her pursuit aside, give it a rest, but she didn’t. I think part of it was being pursued by the muse but also, I’m sure it was pure will power. I am so much more aware about false choices between passion and people.

For You: Have you or do you experience false choices in your life? Have you ever been able to turn an “or” into an “and”? What is your finest example of passion/family integration? Do you have pictures as evidence? 🙂

Create a legacy.

Someday her daughter will read this book and she will really KNOW her mother. Way more deeply than family stories and her own six year old memories could yield. This is such an amazing gift. To be known.

Perhaps the most touching aspect of this novel was that since it was unfinished upon Michelle’s death, it was lovingly patchwork-ed together by her dear ones and friends that shared her vision. These people tracked her footsteps, scoured her emails and voice memos, assembled her piles of half-used legal pads, pieced together her computer files and blog entries, and waded through droves of banker’s boxes of police reports. They did this all while mourning her loss, because they bought in- to her dedication, to her vision.

For You: What would you consider your legacy? Have you left evidence of your art? Did you at least leave bread crumbs for those who come after? This is not a someday question, this is a “now” question.

This is a testament to the strength and character of Michelle’s relationships. There is no higher love than this. No greater litmus test for loyalty and esteem.
Would my people finish my book for me if I died?
Would I do this for my people?

Invest in relationship.

Strong relationships don’t happen by accident. They don’t happen because you are talented. They don’t happen because you are beautiful. We all know this. But I think we often dismiss the importance of relationship when it comes to our art. I hate that this whole concept has been muddied by the shallow business idea of “networking”.

I’m talking about sharing, being known to others. I’m talking about knowing others and appreciating what they offer. I’m talking about leading with your enthusiasm and curiosity, unapologetically.

For You: What does it feel like to be known, understood by another? When does you enthusiasm for a subject overtake your self-consciousness? Have you experienced the power and exhilaration of holding creative space for someone else?

And somehow, I don’t profess to know how it all works, this alchemy stokes the creative fire for all parties. Instead of competition or isolation, we are lifting each other, raising the vibrations, and even finishing eachother’s books and solving cold case mysteries.

Here it is my dears. I give these thoughts to you and I hope they help you with your writing practice and art making whatever it might be.

Yours in writing it down,

Nora

 

Last Updated On March 20, 2018

 

This is just a taste of what Flux Box has to offer for your writing practice. Pictured above is our very own Judi Galgoczy of Sacred Root Kava and Tea Bar's custom blend CreativiTEA included in your first box!

 

Pre-order your Flux Box today (no obligation) and get your $5 coupon towards your first purchase!

Dear Writers,

Some of you are going to be the type that have laptop out, pen in hand and will want to get to the meat of the matter quickly, while others of you will want the back story, the meander, the build-up before digging in. Feel free to use these questions as a jumping off point for writing/art/journaling or just meditate on them, letting them infuse your daily self-talk and decision making.

And I totally understand because I am both of you. Either read the italicized “For You” sections first or save them until the end. Or heck, do both.

I just finished Michelle McNamara’s first and only novel, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer. I still feel affected, stunned even.
True Crime
Purpose
Mortality
All these concepts that loom large for me right now. Mirrored.

For You: How is what you are reading or otherwise being exposed to, affecting your person and your practice? Are there images or concepts that seem to be coming back to you? What is this season for?

I spent the week doing some creative projects that aren’t writing. I kept feeling drawn to other things and at first I resisted because I felt like my time is so finite and I didn’t trust myself with prioritization. And if I didn’t finish my “have-to’s” and the planned things directly associated with my craft and business, then I had no right to engage in extraneous projects. Right? Is this how it works?

For You: What is your philosophy or strategy when it comes to prioritizing your creative work? Is this something that requires reflection? Does it change over time?

And this whole process excludes family time of course, because family trumps everything (we’ll get back to this).

However I’m realizing that sometimes there are more mysterious, subconscious forces at work and taking these side adventures are so much more central and integrated than I initially suspect. Also- there are lessons and motor memory in the ALLOWING; the allowing of surrender, the allowing of following instincts, the allowing of bringing something into fruition, the allowing of stepping outside linear living, the allowing of inexperience, the allowing of finishing or not finishing, the allowing of having expectations met or not, the allowing of flexibility in vision, the allowing of floundering, of tolerance.

For You: What are your side adventures? How do they inform your process? What do you learn in the ALLOWING?

And then there are the questions of productivity, how to negotiate the weighing of what is a waste of time. A question for the ages with no standard, no objective data. And then there is the peer pressure and the murky areas where “wasting time” feels more acceptable (like media consumption etc.), while other pursuits are pushed back.

Its hard to be intrinsically motivated, your own lonely motor, being led by an unshakable idea shared by no one propelling you forward. It can be a little intimidating- without labels, without recompense.

For You: If its not money and its not notoriety, what keeps you going? What brings you back when you are ready to quit?

And then there are the inner and outer voices of dissent and guilt listing all the things more deserving of your attention. But here’s the thing: if you WEREN’T following your bliss would your house be pristine, would you be flush with cash, would your children be more perfect? Probably fucking not.

For You: As a flight of fantasy, what would it actually look like if you truly wasted your time? Seriously. Take it to the extreme. Write it out science fiction style.

So maybe this IS self care.

Stepping outside.

Maybe we have been grossly miseducated about the actual nature of nurturing our own selves. And it has been so enmeshed with our patriarchal, consumerist, busy worshipping culture that we can’t even discern it through this distortion. Its become like blindly throwing darts at spa days and yoga retreats and whatever rather than listening to what our wisest selves are trying so hard to tell us.

For You: What is this “self-care”- go! PS- I have nothing against yoga or spas.

Let me back up a little to Michelle’s book. Actually let me back up a little more to Michelle herself. Michelle McNamara was wife to actor/comedian Patton Oswalt if that gives you context. I know her through True Crime Diary (her beautifully written and thoughtfully conceived blog). Michelle died young and unexpectedly before she finished her book.

Finding a truly great true crime writer is rare. And I say that as a total non-genre-snob reader. And believe me, I’ve clawed my way through the painful scrawlings of true crime authors just to glean more information about fascinating cases, tomes not much removed from the terse police reports they were probably ripped from (I’m looking at you Zodiac). But some true crime writers…they have the touch. They bring you into their world of connection to events and humanize perpetrator, victim, and investigator all. They are skilled storytellers that can weave a riveting narrative from sometimes complicated, scant, or incomplete fact bringing the whole thing to life and clarity without violating the “true” in true crime. And just when you settle into the hum of linear expository aspects, they hit you with a detail so excruciatingly human that its like a gut punch. In a good way of course.

For You: Some of my favorite true crime novels- In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule. Have you written any true stories? Investigative journalism? Would it be fun to try?

I will never tire of this flow. The TRUE part is really foundational for me, and in this case Michelle’s truth is as well. Reading her book was an immersive experience but not an escapist one. Knowing about her death put me on a parallel path of experiencing it. As she describes her long road trips to revisit crime scenes, late nights doing research, and her self described distraction and obsession with the Golden State Killer case- I kept asking her, if you knew, would you do anything different? Followed by the occasion intrusive thought of “oh my God, she has no idea!”.

None of us has any idea.

And I realize that this is a concept that I am drawn to exploring through true crime- one day normal, the next unimaginable. So it is this duality that made reading Michelle’s book so heart opening.

For You: Why do you like what you like? This is a really important question. Break it down.

What did I learn from Michelle:

Don’t be afraid to lean toward passion.

When I saw pictures of Michelle’s six year old daughter Alice pretending to proofread a manuscript or snuggled in bed next to Michelle while she does research on God knows what on her laptop- it struck me that there is so much room for connection in life. Unscripted, unplanned, unpackaged connection as mothers as partners, as friends and there is also plenty of room for US. Room for OUR passions and OUR purpose as part of this expanse.

Time is finite but relative. I realize that its not always easy, there are conflicts and limited resources and all that but I KNOW that I have released in ways I didn’t need to, in the name of family but not actually to their benefit or request.

It is scary to lean toward passion, to make that leap, to be responsible for that decision. But over and over again I see examples of the richness and fullness of a passionate life lived. Michelle had EVERY reason to put her pursuit aside, give it a rest, but she didn’t. I think part of it was being pursued by the muse but also, I’m sure it was pure will power. I am so much more aware about false choices between passion and people.

For You: Have you or do you experience false choices in your life? Have you ever been able to turn an “or” into an “and”? What is your finest example of passion/family integration? Do you have pictures as evidence? 🙂

Create a legacy.

Someday her daughter will read this book and she will really KNOW her mother. Way more deeply than family stories and her own six year old memories could yield. This is such an amazing gift. To be known.

Perhaps the most touching aspect of this novel was that since it was unfinished upon Michelle’s death, it was lovingly patchwork-ed together by her dear ones and friends that shared her vision. These people tracked her footsteps, scoured her emails and voice memos, assembled her piles of half-used legal pads, pieced together her computer files and blog entries, and waded through droves of banker’s boxes of police reports. They did this all while mourning her loss, because they bought in- to her dedication, to her vision.

For You: What would you consider your legacy? Have you left evidence of your art? Did you at least leave bread crumbs for those who come after? This is not a someday question, this is a “now” question.

This is a testament to the strength and character of Michelle’s relationships. There is no higher love than this. No greater litmus test for loyalty and esteem.
Would my people finish my book for me if I died?
Would I do this for my people?

Invest in relationship.

Strong relationships don’t happen by accident. They don’t happen because you are talented. They don’t happen because you are beautiful. We all know this. But I think we often dismiss the importance of relationship when it comes to our art. I hate that this whole concept has been muddied by the shallow business idea of “networking”.

I’m talking about sharing, being known to others. I’m talking about knowing others and appreciating what they offer. I’m talking about leading with your enthusiasm and curiosity, unapologetically.

For You: What does it feel like to be known, understood by another? When does you enthusiasm for a subject overtake your self-consciousness? Have you experienced the power and exhilaration of holding creative space for someone else?

And somehow, I don’t profess to know how it all works, this alchemy stokes the creative fire for all parties. Instead of competition or isolation, we are lifting each other, raising the vibrations, and even finishing eachother’s books and solving cold case mysteries.

Here it is my dears. I give these thoughts to you and I hope they help you with your writing practice and art making whatever it might be.

Yours in writing it down,

Nora

Last Updated On March 20, 2018

This is just a taste of what Flux Box has to offer for your writing practice. Pictured above is our very own Judi Galgoczy of Sacred Root Kava and Tea Bar's custom blend CreativiTEA included in your first box!

Pre-order your Flux Box today (no obligation) and get your $5 coupon towards your first purchase!

Dear Writers,

Some of you are going to be the type that have laptop out, pen in hand and will want to get to the meat of the matter quickly, while others of you will want the back story, the meander, the build-up before digging in. Feel free to use these questions as a jumping off point for writing/art/journaling or just meditate on them, letting them infuse your daily self-talk and decision making.

And I totally understand because I am both of you. Either read the italicized “For You” sections first or save them until the end. Or heck, do both.

I just finished Michelle McNamara’s first and only novel, I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer. I still feel affected, stunned even.
True Crime
Purpose
Mortality
All these concepts that loom large for me right now. Mirrored.

For You: How is what you are reading or otherwise being exposed to, affecting your person and your practice? Are there images or concepts that seem to be coming back to you? What is this season for?

I spent the week doing some creative projects that aren’t writing. I kept feeling drawn to other things and at first I resisted because I felt like my time is so finite and I didn’t trust myself with prioritization. And if I didn’t finish my “have-to’s” and the planned things directly associated with my craft and business, then I had no right to engage in extraneous projects. Right? Is this how it works?

For You: What is your philosophy or strategy when it comes to prioritizing your creative work? Is this something that requires reflection? Does it change over time?

And this whole process excludes family time of course, because family trumps everything (we’ll get back to this).

However I’m realizing that sometimes there are more mysterious, subconscious forces at work and taking these side adventures are so much more central and integrated than I initially suspect. Also- there are lessons and motor memory in the ALLOWING; the allowing of surrender, the allowing of following instincts, the allowing of bringing something into fruition, the allowing of stepping outside linear living, the allowing of inexperience, the allowing of finishing or not finishing, the allowing of having expectations met or not, the allowing of flexibility in vision, the allowing of floundering, of tolerance.

For You: What are your side adventures? How do they inform your process? What do you learn in the ALLOWING?

And then there are the questions of productivity, how to negotiate the weighing of what is a waste of time. A question for the ages with no standard, no objective data. And then there is the peer pressure and the murky areas where “wasting time” feels more acceptable (like media consumption etc.), while other pursuits are pushed back.

Its hard to be intrinsically motivated, your own lonely motor, being led by an unshakable idea shared by no one propelling you forward. It can be a little intimidating- without labels, without recompense.

For You: If its not money and its not notoriety, what keeps you going? What brings you back when you are ready to quit?

And then there are the inner and outer voices of dissent and guilt listing all the things more deserving of your attention. But here’s the thing: if you WEREN’T following your bliss would your house be pristine, would you be flush with cash, would your children be more perfect? Probably fucking not.

For You: As a flight of fantasy, what would it actually look like if you truly wasted your time? Seriously. Take it to the extreme. Write it out science fiction style.

So maybe this IS self care.

Stepping outside.

Maybe we have been grossly miseducated about the actual nature of nurturing our own selves. And it has been so enmeshed with our patriarchal, consumerist, busy worshipping culture that we can’t even discern it through this distortion. Its become like blindly throwing darts at spa days and yoga retreats and whatever rather than listening to what our wisest selves are trying so hard to tell us.

For You: What is this “self-care”- go! PS- I have nothing against yoga or spas.

Let me back up a little to Michelle’s book. Actually let me back up a little more to Michelle herself. Michelle McNamara was wife to actor/comedian Patton Oswalt if that gives you context. I know her through True Crime Diary (her beautifully written and thoughtfully conceived blog). Michelle died young and unexpectedly before she finished her book.

Finding a truly great true crime writer is rare. And I say that as a total non-genre-snob reader. And believe me, I’ve clawed my way through the painful scrawlings of true crime authors just to glean more information about fascinating cases, tomes not much removed from the terse police reports they were probably ripped from (I’m looking at you Zodiac). But some true crime writers…they have the touch. They bring you into their world of connection to events and humanize perpetrator, victim, and investigator all. They are skilled storytellers that can weave a riveting narrative from sometimes complicated, scant, or incomplete fact bringing the whole thing to life and clarity without violating the “true” in true crime. And just when you settle into the hum of linear expository aspects, they hit you with a detail so excruciatingly human that its like a gut punch. In a good way of course.

For You: Some of my favorite true crime novels- In Cold Blood by Truman Capote and The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule. Have you written any true stories? Investigative journalism? Would it be fun to try?

I will never tire of this flow. The TRUE part is really foundational for me, and in this case Michelle’s truth is as well. Reading her book was an immersive experience but not an escapist one. Knowing about her death put me on a parallel path of experiencing it. As she describes her long road trips to revisit crime scenes, late nights doing research, and her self described distraction and obsession with the Golden State Killer case- I kept asking her, if you knew, would you do anything different? Followed by the occasion intrusive thought of “oh my God, she has no idea!”.

None of us has any idea.

And I realize that this is a concept that I am drawn to exploring through true crime- one day normal, the next unimaginable. So it is this duality that made reading Michelle’s book so heart opening.

For You: Why do you like what you like? This is a really important question. Break it down.

What did I learn from Michelle:

Don’t be afraid to lean toward passion.

When I saw pictures of Michelle’s six year old daughter Alice pretending to proofread a manuscript or snuggled in bed next to Michelle while she does research on God knows what on her laptop- it struck me that there is so much room for connection in life. Unscripted, unplanned, unpackaged connection as mothers as partners, as friends and there is also plenty of room for US. Room for OUR passions and OUR purpose as part of this expanse.

Time is finite but relative. I realize that its not always easy, there are conflicts and limited resources and all that but I KNOW that I have released in ways I didn’t need to, in the name of family but not actually to their benefit or request.

It is scary to lean toward passion, to make that leap, to be responsible for that decision. But over and over again I see examples of the richness and fullness of a passionate life lived. Michelle had EVERY reason to put her pursuit aside, give it a rest, but she didn’t. I think part of it was being pursued by the muse but also, I’m sure it was pure will power. I am so much more aware about false choices between passion and people.

For You: Have you or do you experience false choices in your life? Have you ever been able to turn an “or” into an “and”? What is your finest example of passion/family integration? Do you have pictures as evidence? 🙂

Create a legacy.

Someday her daughter will read this book and she will really KNOW her mother. Way more deeply than family stories and her own six year old memories could yield. This is such an amazing gift. To be known.

Perhaps the most touching aspect of this novel was that since it was unfinished upon Michelle’s death, it was lovingly patchwork-ed together by her dear ones and friends that shared her vision. These people tracked her footsteps, scoured her emails and voice memos, assembled her piles of half-used legal pads, pieced together her computer files and blog entries, and waded through droves of banker’s boxes of police reports. They did this all while mourning her loss, because they bought in- to her dedication, to her vision.

For You: What would you consider your legacy? Have you left evidence of your art? Did you at least leave bread crumbs for those who come after? This is not a someday question, this is a “now” question.

This is a testament to the strength and character of Michelle’s relationships. There is no higher love than this. No greater litmus test for loyalty and esteem.
Would my people finish my book for me if I died?
Would I do this for my people?

Invest in relationship.

Strong relationships don’t happen by accident. They don’t happen because you are talented. They don’t happen because you are beautiful. We all know this. But I think we often dismiss the importance of relationship when it comes to our art. I hate that this whole concept has been muddied by the shallow business idea of “networking”.

I’m talking about sharing, being known to others. I’m talking about knowing others and appreciating what they offer. I’m talking about leading with your enthusiasm and curiosity, unapologetically.

For You: What does it feel like to be known, understood by another? When does you enthusiasm for a subject overtake your self-consciousness? Have you experienced the power and exhilaration of holding creative space for someone else?

And somehow, I don’t profess to know how it all works, this alchemy stokes the creative fire for all parties. Instead of competition or isolation, we are lifting each other, raising the vibrations, and even finishing eachother’s books and solving cold case mysteries.

Here it is my dears. I give these thoughts to you and I hope they help you with your writing practice and art making whatever it might be.

Yours in writing it down,

Nora

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