Last Updated On May 10, 2017

 

Revolution is a phase, a mood, like Spring, and just as Spring has its buds and showers, so revolution has its ebullience, its bravery, its hope, and its solidarity. Some of these things pass. -Rebecca Solnit

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“That deserves a full blown sulfuring!”

Um..my notes from last meeting kinda suck. I was in the high stress pre-reading zone. But I was sure to record the witchy quote from Jhenah above! I don’t even know what sulfuring is but I gather its a step above smudging. I dunno, it delighted me when she said it.

Anyhoooo, BIG thank you to Judi who guided us through some photo taking with her wise counsel. In a nutshell (the best shell I can articulate) she asked us to relax our eyes and determine what space in the photo we want to emphasize to our audience. Where does the eye go naturally? How does your vision travel through the image? What gives you pause or interrupts this natural flow? Use zooming, elevation, cropping, angling to get desired results.

The Prisma app (https://prisma-ai.com) and Photoshop Express (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/adobe-photoshop-express-edit-photos-make-collage/id331975235?mt=8) were mentioned as fun photo apps to experiment with. And Judi offered this website for more information: https://petapixel.com/2016/09/14/20-composition-techniques-will-improve-photos/

I would say the biggest lessons I learned about photo taking that day was 1) how important it is to take MANY photos. Like, A LOT to get desired results And 2) how totally impatient I am when taking photos.

We talked about this article, http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/a-thousand-words-writing-from-photographs, which discussed photo taking as a form of shorthand and inspiration. I also offered this article about photography inspired by Rebecca Solnit’s writing, http://hafny.org/blog/2017/4/reading-rebecca-solnit. I thought this was pretty cool since usually the inspiration goes the other way around.

Speaking of Rebecca Solnit, I also read from this article, http://lithub.com/how-to-be-a-writer-10-tips-from-rebecca-solnit/.  I was particularly interested in what she had to say about writers sourcing from current events for their writing. She advocates looking for inspiration from older and more eclectic sources, not getting caught up in what everyone else is doing/writing/reading right now. And to keep in mind that many of literature’s greats were unrecognized during the time they published. Solnit offers permission and logic to being authentic and timeless in our writing which really speaks to me after our Writer’s Block conversation concerning “how to be relevant post-election”.

 

Last Updated On May 10, 2017

 

Revolution is a phase, a mood, like Spring, and just as Spring has its buds and showers, so revolution has its ebullience, its bravery, its hope, and its solidarity. Some of these things pass. -Rebecca Solnit

 

“That deserves a full blown sulfuring!”

Um..my notes from last meeting kinda suck. I was in the high stress pre-reading zone. But I was sure to record the witchy quote from Jhenah above! I don’t even know what sulfuring is but I gather its a step above smudging. I dunno, it delighted me when she said it.

Anyhoooo, BIG thank you to Judi who guided us through some photo taking with her wise counsel. In a nutshell (the best shell I can articulate) she asked us to relax our eyes and determine what space in the photo we want to emphasize to our audience. Where does the eye go naturally? How does your vision travel through the image? What gives you pause or interrupts this natural flow? Use zooming, elevation, cropping, angling to get desired results.

The Prisma app (https://prisma-ai.com) and Photoshop Express (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/adobe-photoshop-express-edit-photos-make-collage/id331975235?mt=8) were mentioned as fun photo apps to experiment with. And Judi offered this website for more information: https://petapixel.com/2016/09/14/20-composition-techniques-will-improve-photos/

I would say the biggest lessons I learned about photo taking that day was 1) how important it is to take MANY photos. Like, A LOT to get desired results And 2) how totally impatient I am when taking photos.

We talked about this article, http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/a-thousand-words-writing-from-photographs, which discussed photo taking as a form of shorthand and inspiration. I also offered this article about photography inspired by Rebecca Solnit’s writing, http://hafny.org/blog/2017/4/reading-rebecca-solnit. I thought this was pretty cool since usually the inspiration goes the other way around.

Speaking of Rebecca Solnit, I also read from this article, http://lithub.com/how-to-be-a-writer-10-tips-from-rebecca-solnit/.  I was particularly interested in what she had to say about writers sourcing from current events for their writing. She advocates looking for inspiration from older and more eclectic sources, not getting caught up in what everyone else is doing/writing/reading right now. And to keep in mind that many of literature’s greats were unrecognized during the time they published. Solnit offers permission and logic to being authentic and timeless in our writing which really speaks to me after our Writer’s Block conversation concerning “how to be relevant post-election”.

Last Updated On May 10, 2017

Revolution is a phase, a mood, like Spring, and just as Spring has its buds and showers, so revolution has its ebullience, its bravery, its hope, and its solidarity. Some of these things pass. -Rebecca Solnit

“That deserves a full blown sulfuring!”

Um..my notes from last meeting kinda suck. I was in the high stress pre-reading zone. But I was sure to record the witchy quote from Jhenah above! I don’t even know what sulfuring is but I gather its a step above smudging. I dunno, it delighted me when she said it.

Anyhoooo, BIG thank you to Judi who guided us through some photo taking with her wise counsel. In a nutshell (the best shell I can articulate) she asked us to relax our eyes and determine what space in the photo we want to emphasize to our audience. Where does the eye go naturally? How does your vision travel through the image? What gives you pause or interrupts this natural flow? Use zooming, elevation, cropping, angling to get desired results.

The Prisma app (https://prisma-ai.com) and Photoshop Express (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/adobe-photoshop-express-edit-photos-make-collage/id331975235?mt=8) were mentioned as fun photo apps to experiment with. And Judi offered this website for more information: https://petapixel.com/2016/09/14/20-composition-techniques-will-improve-photos/

I would say the biggest lessons I learned about photo taking that day was 1) how important it is to take MANY photos. Like, A LOT to get desired results And 2) how totally impatient I am when taking photos.

We talked about this article, http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/a-thousand-words-writing-from-photographs, which discussed photo taking as a form of shorthand and inspiration. I also offered this article about photography inspired by Rebecca Solnit’s writing, http://hafny.org/blog/2017/4/reading-rebecca-solnit. I thought this was pretty cool since usually the inspiration goes the other way around.

Speaking of Rebecca Solnit, I also read from this article, http://lithub.com/how-to-be-a-writer-10-tips-from-rebecca-solnit/.  I was particularly interested in what she had to say about writers sourcing from current events for their writing. She advocates looking for inspiration from older and more eclectic sources, not getting caught up in what everyone else is doing/writing/reading right now. And to keep in mind that many of literature’s greats were unrecognized during the time they published. Solnit offers permission and logic to being authentic and timeless in our writing which really speaks to me after our Writer’s Block conversation concerning “how to be relevant post-election”.